FilmOpinionOscars Coverage 2015

Golden Globe Film Nominations: Snubs and Surprises

James Canellos ’17 / Emertaiment Monthly Staff Writer

Snubs:

Gone Girl (Best Motion Picture – Drama)
Ben Affleck in Gone Girl. Photo Credit: Merrick Morton/Twentieth Century Fox.
Ben Affleck in Gone Girl. Photo Credit: Merrick Morton/Twentieth Century Fox.

This snub is the most shocking because it got nominated for best original score, screenplay, director and actress, yet it couldn’t secure a best picture nod. Gone Girl not only made more money then all the nominated films combined, but it’s critically adored and much more thought provoking then say Foxcatcher and The Theory of Everything. Luckily, it shouldn’t have a problem securing a best picture nod at the Oscars since there can be up to 10 nominations.

A Most Violent Year (Numerous Categories)
Jessica Chastain and Oscar Isaac in A Most Violent Year. Photo Credit: Atsushi Nishijima/A24.
Jessica Chastain and Oscar Isaac in A Most Violent Year. Photo Credit: Atsushi Nishijima/A24.

It would be one thing if this film had gotten completely snubbed, then it would probably be because it was such a late addition. But, Jessica Chastain earned some much deserved love for this quietly epic, little drama. This is one of the best films of the year, directed so carefully by J.C. Chandor and acted so brilliantly by Oscar Isaac. Thankfully it was recognized by the National Board of Review for best film. Hopefully A Most Violent Year gets a little louder so that the Oscar voters will hear it roar.

Unbroken (Best Motion Picture: Drama & Best Director)
Jack O'Connell in Unbroken. Photo Credit: Universal Pictures.
Jack O’Connell in Unbroken. Photo Credit: Universal Pictures.

What seemed like a sure thing only a month ago, now seems to be fading away. Angelina Jolie’s biography of Olympian/WWII veteran Louis Zamperini has failed to receive any love from the Globes, the Screen Actors Guild and most critics awards given out these past two weeks. Jolie’s directorial debut In the Land of Blood and Honey was nominated during it’s year for best foreign language film.

Whiplash (Best Original Screenplay and Best Motion Picture: Drama)
Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons in Whiplash. Photo Credit: Sony Pictures Classics.
Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons in Whiplash. Photo Credit: Sony Pictures Classics.

This one was more of a long shot to begin with, but it’s been hailed as one of the year’s best and already has J.K. Simmons’ performance to help gain some more attention. The screenplay is brilliantly intense as is the rest of the film, it would have been the most independent film nominated but also one of the most deserving.

Mr. Turner (Best Actor: Drama)
Timothy Spall in Mr. Turner. Photo Credit: Simon Mein/Sony Pictures Classics.
Timothy Spall in Mr. Turner. Photo Credit: Simon Mein/Sony Pictures Classics.

The reliable character actor chews up the role as famed British painter J.M.W. Turner. Timothy Spall’s been universally praised for his work and has already won best actor at the Cannes film festival. Considering the biographical nature and content of Mr. Turner it’s surprising Spall couldn’t squeak in.

Two Days, One Night (Best Actress: Drama & Best Foreign Language Film)
Marion Cotillard in Two Days, One Night. Photo Credit: Sundance Selects.
Marion Cotillard in Two Days, One Night. Photo Credit: Sundance Selects.

Sadly this years Best Actress race is incredibly slow. Unlike the other actings categories, there aren’t an abundance of performances that are fighting to fill that final slot. Marion Cotillard, has been flying under the radar for months now and is over due for another nomination. The film itself about a mother who only has two days to save her job, and is heartbreaking and up to date enough to deserve a Best Foreign Film Nomination.

Obvious Child (Best Picture: Comedy & Best Actress: Comedy)
Jenny Slate in Obvious Child. Photo Credit: A24 Films.
Jenny Slate in Obvious Child. Photo Credit: A24 Films.

This hidden gem was released last June and it still ponders through my head. It’s the first ever romantic – abortion – comedy, and despite its topic proves to be smart, sweet and at times hilarious. Comedian Jenny Slate offers so much humor and depth to someone that could easily be your friend, daughter or yourself.

Top Five (Best Picture: Comedy & Best Actor: Comedy)
Chris Rock and Rosario Dawson in Top Five. Photo Credit: Ali Paige Goldstein/Paramount Pictures.
Chris Rock and Rosario Dawson in Top Five. Photo Credit: Ali Paige Goldstein/Paramount Pictures.

Chris Rock bared it all in this semi-autobiographical film, in more then one way. He channels his inner Woody Allen to create an honest modern insight on fame and the consequences of being too successful. The film would be the only genuine comedy on the list of nominations and it boosts the best performance of Chris Rock’s acting career.

The Lego Movie (Best Original Song)
A still from The Lego Movie. Photo Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures.
A still from The Lego Movie. Photo Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures.

Yes, it’s a silly song but it is an extremely catchy one that reflects the animated film’s underlying fascist society. How many of the songs nominated have you and your friends started singing to each other after the movie ended?

Surprises:

Nightcrawler (Best Actor: Drama)
Jake Gyllenhaal in Nightcrawler. Photo Credit: Chuck Zlotnick/Open Road Films.
Jake Gyllenhaal in Nightcrawler. Photo Credit: Chuck Zlotnick/Open Road Films.

Probably one of the most delightful surprises of the morning was Jake Gyllenhaal’s unconventionally creepy role as Lou Bloom. There was fear that his role might be considered too strange and unsympathetic to garner as much praise as he has been getting. Unexpected? Yes. Completely deserving? Absolutely.

Cake (Best Actress: Drama)
Jennifer Aniston in Cake.
Jennifer Aniston in Cake.

Jennifer Aniston’s performance is becoming a major player for the actress after also nabbing a Screen Actors Guild award yesterday. With such an uncompetitive group in the Best Actress race this year, she might be able to go the distance.

Pride (Best Picture: Comedy)
Faye Marsay, George Mackay, Joseph Gilgun, Paddy Considine and Ben Schnetzer in Pride. Photo Credit: Nicola Dove/CBS Films.
Faye Marsay, George Mackay, Joseph Gilgun, Paddy Considine and Ben Schnetzer in Pride. Photo Credit: Nicola Dove/CBS Films.

This is the little film that could, despite it’s lack of box office receipts this warm comedy made it into the Best Picture – Musical or Comedy race. The film tells the true story of gay activists in 1984 England who help raise money for striking miners, and clearly it made an impression.

Annie (Best Actress: Comedy)
Cameron Diaz, Jamie Foxx, Rose Byrne, Stephanie Kurtzuba, Nicolette Pierini, Amanda Troya and Quvenzhané Wallis in Annie. Photo Credit: Barry Wetcher/Sony Pictures.
Cameron Diaz, Jamie Foxx, Rose Byrne, Stephanie Kurtzuba, Nicolette Pierini, Amanda Troya and Quvenzhané Wallis in Annie. Photo Credit: Barry Wetcher/Sony Pictures.

What did you think was the biggest snub/surprise from the Golden Globe film nominations? 

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