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Review: "Lovestruck: The Musical"

Shannan Singletary ’16 / Emertainment Monthly Staff

ADRIENNE BAILON, SARA PAXTON, ALEXANDER JOHN, DAVID SANTIAGO, MARK TALLMAN. Photo  credit: ABC FAMILY/Donald Rager.
ADRIENNE BAILON, SARA PAXTON, ALEXANDER JOHN, DAVID SANTIAGO, MARK TALLMAN. Photo credit: ABC FAMILY/Donald Rager.

ABC Famiy’s newest movie Lovestruck: The Musical is about as silly as its name suggests.

The movie tells the story of Mirabella (Sara Paxton), a young Broadway star that decides to quit show business, and the current musical she stars in to marry Italian playboy, Marco (Alexander DiPersia).

Mirabella’s mother, Harper (Jane Seymour), is not happy with the idea and thinks her daughter is throwing her life away, so she hops on a plane and makes her way to Italy to try and convince Mirabella that Marco is no good for her.

When Harper arrives at the airport, she decides to drink a bit of this weird concoction. She found it in an old desk drawer at the back of a theater (because who wouldn’t drink that?). Harper drank it in an attempt to ease the pain of her injured knee. (I would also like to point out the fact that TSA would never have allowed her to fly with this tonic in her bag because it definitely exceeded 3.4 ounces.)

The remedy has a strange side effect though, and she ends up turning into a much younger version of herself (Chelsea Kane).  Harper decides to use this as a tool to get her daughter and Marco to call off the marriage.

The only thing cheesier in this movie than its plot line was its music. The movie featured a mixture of original music and covers of pop songs, such as Lady Gaga’s “Just Dance,” Madonna’s “Like a Virgin,” and Usher’s “DJ Got Us Falling in Love.”

All of the musical numbers in the movie sounded too similar, for my liking. Each song seemed very computerized as well as stereotypically pop-sounding. Thinking back on the movie after it was over I had a hard time distinguishing the different musical numbers from each other.

The musical numbers came into a scene very awkwardly. The transitions from a regular scene into a song rarely seemed to flow smoothly together as they do in other musicals, making it harder to accept these performances as a normal aspect of the scene.

This movie could potentially be a hit with the tween crowd, but as a college student I’d suggest you spend the extra hour and a half studying (or, you know, sleeping).

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